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Babies Babies Family Fun For Parents

Postnatal Care: Why is it important for mums

Congratulations on your new baby! As a new mother, you may experience many changes, both physically and mentally. It is therefore important for you to practice good postnatal care and receive necessary support to recover from childbirth as you take on parenthood. Good postnatal care can also help to identify medical and physiological conditions that may occur after pregnancy and childbirth.

Particularly in Asian culture, new mothers traditionally undergo confinement for 30 days, or, up to an extended period of 3 months immediately after childbirth. During this period of post-partum recovery, depending on the culture you belong to, there may be many confinement rules to observe (Read: Confinement Myths), but generally, you can expect to gradually fall into a routine and adjust to your new normal. In the meantime, here are tips on getting the postnatal care in check as you get in the groove with the new addition:

Schedule rest

A family that gets enough rest stays together.

Getting sufficient rest is one of the most challenging things to achieve postnatal. The lack of rest can leave one feeling tired, more susceptible to emotional changes and slower recuperating for your childbirth wounds. Hormones are often out of whack during this period too, so it is important to rest. While you will need to make time for daily activities like eating, bathing (if preferred) and toilet breaks, you can aim for maximum rest by taking short naps throughout the day. As the saying goes “Sleep when your baby sleeps”, many mothers find it helpful to plan rest time around the baby’s sleep schedule.

Eat nourishing foods

Load up on greens to nourish your postpartum body.

Foods that are considered nourishing during confinement varies across cultures and traditions. In generally, maintaining a healthy diet of whole grains, proteins, fruits and vegetables as well as good amounts of fluid intake will give your body the necessary resources towards a speedy recovery from childbirth. Eating well is essential during the postnatal period to allow your body to heal and replenish lost blood and energy. If you are breastfeeding, it is necessary to ensure that you take in at least 2 litres of fluids daily, to stay hydrated.

Take a breather and focus on your wellbeing, new mummy!

Even a 5-min break can do wonders for you, new mum!

In the process of adjusting to motherhood, new mothers sometimes neglect caring about your own wellbeing. It is important to ensure that your postnatal period is a comfortable, happy and healthy one. This may be an overwhelming and stressful time; new mothers will benefit from being patient with yourself and to take breaks during the day to do what you enjoy doing. It can be as simple as reading the news, or, watching your favourite show – dedicating time to yourself can do wonders to your mind, body and soul!

Seek help whenever you need

Grandparents are often very willing helpers – consider roping them in as part of your postnatal care plans!

In order to prioritise rest and your well-being for postnatal recovery, do not hesitate to raise your hands to seek help or accept help from family and friends.  (Read: How dads can help with breastfeeding.) Other than direct latching to breastfeed, others will be able to help you with things like preparing meals, run errands, care for other children at home, or even hold the fort for a few hours for you to have some me time or couple time. Remember, receiving help is less about the inability to cope on your own. It is more about prioritising your family’s needs during this recovery period with a vision on adjusting to the family’s new normal in the long run.

Motherhood takes time to adjust to and sharing feelings and the burden of problems with your family helps tackle them together, and brings you closer together as a family unit.

We hope this simple guide can help you transition into motherhood with more ease. Please feel free to share what you worked for you as part of your postnatal care plans.

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For Parents Toddlers

Parents Share: How to Prepare Kids for their First Dental Visit

Parents are often unsure of when to bring their child to the dentist, and some wait until all teeth have erupted.

 

However, it is recommended that the first dental visit start from the moment the first tooth has erupted, and no later than one to two years of age. As with adults, children should visit the dentist once every six months, or more frequently if there is a dental issue.

 

Let’s find out how parents in Singapore made the first dental visit for kids less scary– with helpful tips for other families too!

 

Your child’s first dental visit doesn’t have to be as scary as you imagine!

 

#1: Search for a paediatric dentist

Mothers Jessie Pek and Larissa Sim agree that finding a good paediatric dentist is half the job done, as the experienced dentist would know how to manage kids better and deal with any fear that the child may have about having their teeth checked.

 

Jessie’s son was less than three years old when he went for his first dental appointment and the visit turned out to be surprisingly pleasant.

 

“There was a small decay, so the dentist suggested filing without polishing or washing other teeth to keep the visit short. After that, my boy has been okay with going for dental appointments”.

 

Larissa’s daughter encountered a bad experience at a generalist dental clinic as the cubicles were not soundproof and the cries and screams from another cubicle traumatised her greatly. Since then, she has switched to a private paediatric dentist.

 

Evonne Wong, mum to a three-year-old daughter, shares that her experience with a paediatric dentist was much better compared to the first time as the dentist was gentle. Her daughter reacted so positively to the dentist that “she will look for him whenever food is stuck between her teeth”!

 

#2: Familiarise them with the process

As there is fear from the unknown, children(and perhaps, some parents too!) tend to over-imagine things and scare themselves over the first visit to the dentist. The trick is to show them that it’s not so scary as they imagine! When explaining, keep it factual and avoid adding in emotions.

 

Mummy Larissa suggests reading a lot of books and showing videos of toddlers at the dentist, preferably those that feature dental tools and patients younger than your child to familiarise them with the process.

Use non-fluoride kids toothpaste for your child until they learn how to spit.

 

#3: Maintain healthy oral hygiene

Maintaining healthy oral habits on a daily basis is the key to preventing dental caries from forming in the mouth. Introduce the concept of brushing teeth with non-fluoride toothpaste at least twice a day, especially after meals and before bedtime. Reinforce to them that the cleaner their teeth are, the lesser time they will have to spend at the dentist’s clinic.

 

If your child is able to spit, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste, as it is the key ingredient to keeping teeth squeaky clean.

 

For strong, healthy teeth, ensure that your toddler takes in essential nutrients such as calcium and Vitamin D through breastmilk and/or formula milk to support healthy teeth and gum development.

Parents can help children handle their first dental visit like rockstars!

 

#4 Be Positive

Mum Dandan Liang chooses to explain the positives of visiting the dentist to her son and it worked as her son’s first dental visit was a breeze. She took her son to the dentist as she was worried about some shadow on his front teeth. Before they entered the room, she described what the process would be like and what he needed to do.

 

“I told him that he had to open his mouth so the dentist could check what was wrong with his teeth and make it white again”, she adds. The experience went better than expected as the dentist fashioned a balloon with a smiley face out of a latex glove as a gift for her son.

 

#5 Expect the Unexpected

As the popular saying goes, “Expect the Unexpected”. There was no time for Mummy Jessica Lu to prepare her son, as his first visit to the dentist was an emergency when his sister knocked his front tooth loose. Surprisingly, her son remained calm and the dentist managed to save his tooth.

 

How was your child’s first visit to the dentist like? Do share your tips on making your child’s first dental trip a fearless one!

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Babies For Parents Toddlers Uncategorized

How to manage older siblings while breastfeeding

It’s your second baby and you’re all excited to breastfeed the way you want it to be this time round. You think you’ve got all the techniques down to a T and you’ve diligently taken your supplements and fluids and soups in a bid to boost breast milk production.

You pick up your baby to nurse and suddenly, in comes your toddler, throwing a tantrum or insisting that you carry him instead. All your grand plans seem to have gone out of the window with a crying baby and a whiny toddler at hand. But rest assured, there are ways to make breastfeeding manageable, and even an enjoyable journey, for everyone in the family.

Breastfeeding not only provides babies with the necessary nutrients, it’s also beneficial for mums!

Talk to your older child(ren) about breastfeeding the baby

If you can, speak to your older children about breastfeeding the baby before the baby is born. Let them ask whatever questions they might have and answer in a way that they can relate to and would understand.

After the baby is born, and before feeding time, speak to them again to remind them what you have discussed earlier. If they have any more questions, they can still ask them. Keeping them informed and involved would help them to cope with the anxieties and insecurities of having a new baby sibling around.

Involve your kids during nursing time

We all feel slightly more forgetful after childbirth, and sometimes we forget that extra cushion or pillow to prop ourselves up or that little hanky to wipe the dribbles off baby’s face. In come our little superheroes to save the day.

Instead of disrupting the feed, simply get the older siblings to help bring you the items. Remember to lavish them with praise, to thank them for their effort in helping to make nursing the baby go smoothly. Children love to be involved and praised, and you’ve just done both, so you’re off to a good start.

Make those breastfeeding sessions a special time for the family

When I used to nurse my baby, I’d read to my older child or sing songs with her. She’d get to pick out the book before the feed and sit right next to me during the feed. Sometimes, she would want to sing and dance to a song and we’d have a good chuckle.

If that’s too much activity for your nursing infant (not all babies are the same), you can try putting on a special cartoon or movie to watch together with the older siblings, or allowing them access to some toys which are only available to them during nursing time. You would be surprised that the older siblings might look forward to breastfeeding time!

A simple box containing some special toys reserved for nursing time can come in handy to keep older kids entertained when you need to breastfeed your newborn.

You can always ask for help from those you trust

“It takes a village to raise a child.” We are not supermoms all the time. Sometimes, even supermoms need a breather and some help. You canask for help when you need it. It is understandable that not everyone provides good or reliable help, so ask from those whom you trust your children to be with. They could take the older siblings for a walk in the park or keep them entertained while you nurse. That’s when dads could chip in too!

Dads are often neglected when it comes to the topic of breastfeeding. However, they can play a crucial role!

Mothering is a rewarding but challenging task. Not every day will be a good day and there might be more bad days than good ones at the start. But knowing what to do and having someone to help out and share the load with would make it less overwhelming. Continue to hang on in there as you supply your little one with liquid gold!

Do you have any more ideas on how to manage older siblings during breastfeeding? Tell us in the comments below!

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For Parents Toddlers Uncategorized

Quick Tips for Potty Training Your Son

Potty training little boys is a process that requires cooperation and consistent encouragement from caregivers. Toilet training typically starts from 18 months of age in advanced countries where diapers are heavily relied on. The best time to start is when your son shows signs of readiness, and during a time where no major changes are expected.

 

Signs of readiness to use the potty include passing a motion at a regular timing, controlling his bladder, being able to stay dry for at least two hours and being able to pull his pants up and down.

 

Though most tips may apply to both boys and girls, there are slightly more challenges when it comes to potty training little boys.

Potty training your toddler requires patience and consistent reminders.

1. Teach your son to sit, not stand
One popular question when it comes to training boys is, “Should they sit or stand to pee?”. The answer is to sit. It takes more skill for young boys to keep still when peeing and sitting prevents the unnecessary mess. When they have successfully mastered the basics, you can then guide them to stand up to pee. Some little boys are able to stand and pee without going through the sitting stage – it all depends on your child’s readiness and comfort level!

 

2. Buy a cute urinal
Once your child can sit to pee, you can start training him to stand up to pee. There are child urinals which are colourful and attractive with water wheels to make it fun for your son to aim his pee at. They can be mounted on the wall and easily removed for cleaning.

 

3. Use loose fitting bottoms

Get him some loose fitting shorts with elasticated waistbands that he can simply tug down to remove when he needs to pass urine. To make it extra special, bring him along to shop for a few pairs with his favourite cartoon characters!

Be prepared to clean up accidents that happen during potty training.

4. Have potty training sessions
The key to successful potty training is consistency. Put your son on the potty every 15 minutes for two to three hours and whistle to encourage him to relieve his bladder, or ask if he needs to poop. At the end of the session, use regular diapers or training pants to go on with the rest of your day. Aim to have at least two training sessions in a day.

 

Training pants come in handy when potty training your son.

 5. Play a game of “Guess the colour of your poop”
For toddlers and preschoolers who can name colours, play a game of guessing the colour of their poop before putting them on the potty. Poop colour is a sign of your son’s health. If he guesses correctly after pooping into the potty, reward him with a small treat.

 

6. Do the Pee Whistle and Poo Hum
Studies have shown that sounds are an effective communication method to trigger the child’s bowel release. Mothers who practice elimination communication, the method of toilet training from infancy, use sound cues such as whistling to let their babies pee and humming for poo.

 

7. Settle day time training before a night training
It is tougher for your son to stay dry during his sleep as it takes much more awareness. Night training can be done after your son can keep his training pants or briefs dry during the day. You can use a waterproof mattress liner and sheet to contain accidental mess if you are letting your son sleep with loose shorts.

 

Limiting drinks before bedtime can help in reducing the need to pee while he is asleep.

 

Potty training involves a lot of communication and closeness to monitor your son’s cues. Don’t be disheartened if it seems to take longer than expected. If your son attends school, check with the teachers how you can work together to support your potty training attempts.

 

Is your son off diapers and uses the potty on his own? Share your potty training strategies in the comments below!

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For Parents Toddlers

Quick Tips for Potty Training Your Daughter

Potty training is the process of getting your child off diapers to relieve themselves in a potty or adult toilet. Going diaper-free is a huge milestone not only for the child but the parents as well. In some parts of Asia and Central America, the “elimination communication” method of toilet training is used, and infants learn from young to control their bladders.

 

For children elsewhere, diapers are used from infancy until they can control their urges successfully. Children can start on potty training anywhere between 18 months to 4 years old, and when they are ready, some children show cues of potty-training readiness especially when they are able to communicate their need to pee or poop.

 

We have compiled a few quick tips on potty training your daughter that you can try out. A tip from one parent to another: loads of patience needed!

 

 

Going on the potty can be terrifying for a small child.

 

  • Let your daughter choose her own potty
    Potties come in all sorts of shapes and sizes and range from the simple pot-like potty to the fancy, mini-sized version of regular toilet bowls, complete with flushing sounds and music. As the potty is something your daughter has to be comfortable to relieve herself in, letting her choose her own potty can make her open up to the idea of using it.

 

  • Incorporate potty time in her daily routine
    By now, you should have a rough idea of how frequently your daughter passes the motion, and when. Ask her at frequent intervals if she would like to try using the potty, or have specific “potty times”, where you lead her to the potty and sit her down. It doesn’t matter if nothing comes out, as the point is to get her familiarised with the action of going to the potty.

 

  • Buy cool training pants or panties
    Bring your daughter out to the nearest shopping centre for a mission – to buy cool training pants or cute panties, depending on your tolerance for accidental leakages. She may feel motivated to wear them if it has her favourite patterns or cartoon characters.

 

  • Set up a rewards chart
    For each time she successfully relieves herself in a potty, pass her a sticker that she can paste on a board to chart her progress and exchange for a small treat. Positive reinforcement (praises, treats and privileges) has been shown to bring out better outcomes than negative reinforcement (chiding, scolding, withholding affection or privileges).

 

Observe poop together
While it may smell, paying some attention to the appearance of your child’s output can give you an idea of your child’s well-being. After all, hospitals use stool samples to check for health conditions. Teach your child to look out for healthy poop and encourage her to eat more vegetables in order to produce healthy poop.

Check out this poop guide as the colour and consistency of poop depends on the type of diet your toddler has. Making poop observation a joint activity can encourage her to poop into the potty.

 

 

Training pants can be worn during potty training to prevent accidental leakages.

 

  • Encourage, encourage and encourage
    Some children get comfortable on the potty within days, while others may take a longer time. Parents have to constantly encourage their child that it is okay even if there are accidents. Most importantly, assure her that you will be there for her no matter how long it takes for her to be off diapers.

 

Ultimately, it all boils down to the comfort level of your daughter and while there are many potty-training tips out there, some trial and error may be needed to find out what works for your daughter. She may just surprise you one day by simply deciding that she no longer wants to wear diapers!

 

Have you started potty training your daughter? Do share some of your most memorable potty-training memories with us!

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Babies For Parents Toddlers

A ‘Thank you’ Letter to My Child’s Father

To the father of my children,

Mothers are often put in the spotlight as the ones who sacrifice their all for the family. While that’s not untrue, fathers are given a lot less credit for what they do. Fathers provide more than financial support but also emotionally. I want you to know that you’re an awesome dad to the children and that I appreciate you.

From the start when we discovered our pregnancy, you have put in effort to be involved in every step of the way. From taking time off work to be there with me during gynaecologist visits, attending prenatal classes together and massaging my aching feet. Oh, and that time when I was pregnant and requested for “pizza, sushi or McDonalds, I don’t know”, and you came back with pizza, sushi AND McDonalds? Perhaps you were satisfying the little baby’s cravings?

As we counted down the days where we would become a small family of three, we were nervous yet eager. Pregnancy hormones gave me mood swings that saw me burst out crying at the smallest things. You would hold me and tell the baby to behave. Prodding my belly made the baby move and you would spend minutes playing with the baby this way. You helped to massage my aching feet that were bloating up from water retention and even helped me to cut my toenails when my tummy was too large for me to reach my toes.

From being there from the start, thank you my dear husband.

In the delivery suite, from the moment we heard our baby cry, our lives changed entirely. I wanted to breastfeed from the start, and you were supportive of it, often bringing me water when I latched so that there would be enough milk for the baby.

You never once shied away from fatherly duties. You handle poopy diapers like a pro, and burp the baby after latching. Sometimes you get puked on, but you laugh it away. I haven’t told you this, but mealtimes are much easier because you take the effort to feed our child instead of being hands-off. Diapers, feeding, bathing, changing clothes, there’s nothing you can’t help with the kids.

Although you’re tired when you return home from work, your face lights up when you see our child running to greet you. You’re the light of her life, and it shows. It is your effort – you invested the time to sit down, play with her and understand her needs. There’s no one else who would be able to play with them the way you do. The kids love it when you carry them on your shoulders. That’s something I wouldn’t be able to do. In a way, carrying them on your shoulders is a symbol of how they can rely on you in their growing-up journey.

Sure, there have been arguments and disagreements on the way we parent our child but overall, I’m glad that we are in this life journey together.

For doing the best that you can, thank you my child’s father.

For loving the family, thank you.

For choosing to end work on time to be at home with the family, thank you.

For giving the children your best, thank you.

Thank you, my dear husband, my child’s father.

Loving you through the tiring days and more,

Your wife and child’s mother

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Babies Babies For Parents Health & Nutrition

Did You Know that Babies Can Have Free Immunisation in Singapore?

Parents in Singapore are provided with a checklist of vaccinations for their child. At birth, newborns receive their first few shots to protect them.

 

Vaccines are made from the same viruses that cause disease. However, the viruses are in an altered state which encourage the immune system to produce antibodies to the particular disease while not causing the actual illness.

 

With the creation of these antibodies, the body can fight back if they ever come into contact with the disease in future. This, combined with exclusive breastfeeding for at least the first six months, helps to boost your baby’s immune system.

 

Vaccination in Singapore – are they compulsory?

 

In Singapore, parents need to note that the Diphtheria and measles vaccinations are compulsory by law.

 

Immunisation records are tracked by the National Immunisation Registry and are required for submission when children enter childcare, preschool and primary school. The Registry also monitors and ensures that every child gets vaccinated at the appropriate timing. If your child receives vaccinations at the polyclinic, the records will be automatically updated. If taken elsewhere, the records have to be updated by the paediatrician.

If your child is a Singapore Citizen, compulsory vaccinations at polyclinics are free of charge!

The compulsory vaccinations listed in the National Childhood Immunisation Programme are fully subsidised for Singapore Citizens if taken at a polyclinic.

 

Vaccinations – are they completely free, or do we have to pay for some of them?

 

At the polyclinic, if there are any developmental check-ups required on the day of the vaccination, it will also be fully subsidised. Parents usually just pay under a dollar for the paracetamol, which can be fed should a fever develop after the injections.

 

If you choose to vaccinate your child at the paediatrician or General Practitioner (GP), it will not be fully subsidised.

 

Many paediatricians offer a package deal for vaccinations and developmental checkups if your baby is not eligible for the subsidies under the National Childhood Immunisation Programme. The package is usually Medisave-deductible.

 

Among the fully subsidised vaccinations, there is a 5-in-1 injection that combines vaccines against Diptheria, Pertussis, Tetanus (DPT), Polio and Haemophilus Influenza type B (Hib) into 1 injection. The Hepatitis B vaccine is administered as a separate injection and provides lifelong immunity, whereas other vaccines may require a booster shot later in life.

 

There is a 6-in-1 injection that includes Hepatitis B but is not subsidised for citizens. However, this can be considered to spare your baby from an additional jab.

Recommended vaccinations that are

fully-subsidised (for Singapore citizens)

Recommended vaccinations that are

non-subsidised

Tuberculosis* Pneumococcal
Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis,

Haemophilus Influenzae Type b, Poliomyelitis

 

 

Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR)
Hepatitis B  

 

Source:https://www.nhgp.com.sg/Our_Services/General_Medical_Services/Child_Health_Services/

 

In the list, only the Pneumococcal vaccine is recommended yet it is non-subsidised. There are a total of three injections and each costs $150 if they are taken at a polyclinic.

 

The pneumoccocal disease is a bacterial infection that often starts with a high fever and can lead to life threatening illnesses such as pneumonia and meningitis. It is the leading cause of infectious disease amongst children worldwide.

 

Although it is non-subsidised, it can be paid through Medisave or via the child’s Child Development Account(CDA), reducing the strain on your wallet. Children who are Singapore citizens receive $3,000 – $4,000 in Medisave grants from the government to defray their healthcare expenses.

Certain vaccinations, such as the MMR (Measles, Mumps and Rubella) vaccine may cause fever in children.

Common side-effects after immunisation

 

Vaccines are generally safe to take, and severe reactions are extremely rare.

 

Some babies may develop a sore armour feel lethargic after the vaccines. It is common for babies to develop a fever about a week after the Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccination.

 

After vaccination, the baby’s diet should remain the same. Some babies may adjust their milk intake, so parents will need to ensure that a balanced diet is offered either through breast milk, formula milk and/or solids. Breastfeeding mums may notice that their babies may wish to nurse more frequently or prefer comfort latching after the injections.

 

Knowing that there is free immunisation for our children is good news for parents. Besides the benefits of protecting them against potentially life-threatening diseases, every cent of saving counts when it comes to raising children.

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Health & Nutrition Toddlers

Hand, Food & Mouth Disease: Help Your Child Feel Better

Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD) is a much dreaded viral disease that most commonly occurs in children below five years old and leaves them feeling immensely uncomfortable. It is contagious and easily spread by direct contact of bodily fluids. A child with HFMD may suffer from fever, sore throat, ulcers and a rash on their hands, feet and buttocks.

 

The first symptom noticeable in your child is usually fever, followed by a sore throat, accompanied by a decrease in appetite. Painful sores and ulcers and rashes subsequently develop a few days after the fever begins.

Fever is the common first visible sign of HFMD. 

As there is currently no treatment for HFMD, the uncomfortable symptoms can be relieved, as child and parents have to wait it out. Because the disease spreads so easily, especially among young children, it’s advisable to avoid public places and stay home until the doctor gives your child the clearance, and that it is okay to return to childcare or school.

 

Ways to relieve the pain and help your child feel better when diagnosed with HFMD

  • Create an oatmeal bath

Blisters are a much-dreaded symptom of HFMD. Oatmeal is effective for soothing inflamed skin and is extremely relaxing. To make an oatmeal bath, simply grind a cup of raw, unflavoured oatmeal into a warm bath and mix it until it is thoroughly blended into the water. Soaking in an oatmeal bath for 15 to 20 minutes helps to calm those angry rashes on your child’s body. Remember to moisturise after drying off!

 

  • Moisturise, moisturise, moisturise!

To deal with skin irritation, lots of moisturising is necessary. Apply coconut oil or skin moisturiser liberally and frequently after baths to help your child deal with those rashes or blisters that are prevalent during the course of HFMD.

 

  • Offer nutritious food in creative ways

Kids who are down with HFMD may refuse food because the painful ulcers in their throat making it hard for them to swallow. Despite the pain and decreased appetite, it is still important for them to take in nutritious food, and stay hydrated. Chinese soups are nutritious and comforting for poor appetites.

 

The icy temperature of frozen breastmilk popsicles or fruit lollies can ease their mouth sores and relieve pain. If they are unable to take in solids, offer non-citrus juices, cold fresh milk or Einmilk formula milk to ensure they receive the daily essential nutrients, especially when their body needs to fight the HFMD bug and heal on its own. Lots of plain water is recommended to flush out toxins.

Frozen fruit popsicles can provide a cold, healthy relief for children with low appetite when HFMD strikes.

 

  • Plan some indoor activities

Besides feeling lethargic and listless, your child will feel uncomfortable dealing with the HFMD symptoms and may feel sad being homebound for more than a week. Look on the bright side – when was the last time you get to spend so much time with your child alone? Though sick, your child will likely enjoy your undivided attention. If your family is open to screen time, you can indulge your child with his favourite movie. Otherwise, work on simple craft activities together, like this lion mask. Set up a teepee or makeshift indoor tent with blankets and pretend you’re at a safari camp! When stuck indoors, imagination works wonders to broaden the mind.

 

  • Lots of Tender Loving Care

Lastly, shower your child with lots of tenders, loving care and attention. Emotional encouragement aids in speeding up the recovery process and builds up a stronger parent-child bond too!

 

What are the best ways to provide relief for your children when they are down with Hand, Food and Mouth Disease? Do share with fellow parents below!

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For Parents Toddlers

Checklist: Things to Pack for Childcare or Preschool

Is your child about to start childcare or preschool in Singapore? Stay calm and let’s get ready with the things to prepare for this new milestone. Fret not if you’re feeling unsure how to start preparing because we’ve come up with a list of items you can pack for your child’s comfort in preschool.

 

This list is non-exhaustive and can differ between preschools but contains the main essential items. Remember to label your child’s name on his or her belongings to minimise the chance of mix-ups!

 

  • Water Bottle
    Water keeps your little one hydrated throughout the day as they are more energetic and expend a lot of energy. Choose a water bottle that is your child has no problems opening or closing to access the straw for drinking.

 

 

  • Milk feeds
    Infant care teachers are trained to handle breast milk. If your child is above 6 months old, you can consider switching your baby from breastmilk to formula milk. Here are some tips on choosing formula milk.In a playgroup, toddlers are given up to two milk feeds a day and you should bring a clean milk bottle with a milk dispenser containing two separate portions of formula milk for easy preparation. Check with the school on the schedule especially if your child is going to full-day childcare and will be napping there.

 

  • Diapers/Underwear
    If your child has yet to be toilet trained, you will need to pack at least 4 pieces of disposable diapers for frequent diaper changes. Otherwise, pack in briefs or panties for your toilet-trained child. When your child shows signs of readiness, teachers will support potty-training and parents can also play their part at home to prepare your son or daughter to go diaper-free. 

 

  • Additional clothing
    You will need to pack clothes for your child to change into after bath time or water play. It is recommended that you pack in a long sleeved sleepsuit if your child attends a childcare centre with air-conditioning. Some school have a different set of uniform for naptime, and some may not allow home clothes to be worn. Do check with your child’s school to clarify. An additional spare set of clothes will come in handy in case it is dirtied.

 

  • Towel
    A medium sized bath towel for drying off after bathtime is needed. Bamboo bath towels are soft, eco-friendly and absorbent. Choose a size that is small enough for your child to handle.

 

  • Wet bag
    Soiled clothes will be placed in a wet bag or plastic bag for laundering at home. This is to prevent other items in the bag from getting dirty. You can purchase waterproof stickers so they can withstand washes.

 

Pack a spare set of clothes in your child’s school bag for childcare or preschool in case of emergency situations.

 

  • Cot Mattress Cover
    For children who attend full-day childcare, they will be napping in school and will need a mattress cover for the mattress that your child will be sleeping on. Some childcare centres include this item in the list of things to pay for during registration, and the school will take care of the washing and labelling. Do check with the school on the arrangement for this.

 

  • Pillow/Blanket
    You can pack along a small pillow and blanket to make nap time more comfortable for your child. Letting him or her to choose which pillow and blanket to bring gives them more autonomy over their decisions. A light and thin blanket will provide a cosy sleep setting in school.While it may help your child overcome anxiety, it is not advisable to bring his or her favourite toy as there is the likelihood of loss or damage.

 

Teddy stays home – bringing beloved possessions to preschool or childcare are not encouraged as there is a risk that it will be misplaced or damaged.

 

  • Snacks
    Childcare centres provide snacks, but a small container of snacks that your child loves is handy to have for nibbling on the way home from school.

 

Finally, with the number of items to pack, you will likely need two school bags – one to store the bedding and another for the rest of the items. To get your child excited for school, bring him or her shopping for their very own school bags!

 

Has your child started preschool or childcare yet? Tell us, how did you prepare him or her for that very first day of school?

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For Parents Toddlers Uncategorized

Tips on Preparing Your Child for Childcare or Preschool

Entering preschool or childcare is a milestone for both parents and child. Educators at the childcare centre typically take care of the child for up to 12 hours each school day, so that means a large part of their day is spent with trusted adults in a safe place.

 

The transition to a new routine which involves new faces and environment – preschool or childcare – can be hard to handle and even traumatic. To help with this, we have come up with a few tips on how to prepare your child not only for their first day of preschool but how to adapt with lesser tears.

 

1. Prepare a comfort item

A comfort item provides emotional security for your child, helping them to deal with the anxiety they experience when away from home for long hours. It can be something that your child already has an attachment to, or a brand new item purchased together.

You can even entrust them to safe keep a personal belonging of yours, like a scarf or handkerchief, until the end of the school day. This reassures them that you will be back to pick them up.

 

2. Read books about preschool
Read books about entering preschool together with your child shows them at a glance what preschool is all about, what to expect, and how they will learn new things with new friends.

 

3. Adjust your schedule at home

Ask for a copy of the schedule from your child’s centre and note when the nap times and bath times are. A few months before they start preschool officially, gradually adjust the schedule at home to match the preschool’s meal and nap times. This will somewhat let the rhythms of the preschool’s schedule feel more natural.

Children get to play and interact with friends and teachers in preschool and childcare, and be engaged in meaningful activities that support those developmental milestones.

 

4. Get your child involved

Visiting the preschool during drop-off and pick-up hours with your child allows them to observe the procedure of how the students bid goodbye to their parents (during drop-off) and reassure them that you will be back for them when school ends (during pick-up). In the process, you can even introduce your child to their future teacher(s) to build familiarity.

 

Also, preparing for preschool involves packing a whole list of items and labelling them. Giving your child the autonomy of deciding the items they want to bring to preschool and the responsibility of labelling them instils a sense of responsibility and pride.

 

5. Provide sufficient time for your child to ease in

It is natural if your child exhibits signs of anxiety or apprehension on entering the childcare premises. Most, if not all, preschools allow parents to accompany their child for the first three days and for half-day each time.

 

If you are unable to do so, sit down with your child and reassure them that you will be back to pick them up, no matter what. After that, say goodbye with confidence as your little one will be able to pick up on any tension or nervousness in your voice.

Preschools in Singapore offer half-day, full-day or three-hour programmes, catering to different family’s needs.

 

Even with these tips, every child reacts differently and it would be reasonable to give your child about one or two months to fully adjust and settle down after making friends. This will also provide the teacher(s) and your child with time to build up their bond, so your child knows that there are trusted adults who will care for him when mummy and daddy are not with him in preschool.

 

What was your child’s first day at preschool or childcare like? Do share your experience with us too!